Daughters of James Stewart Gammell

Alice Rosamond Bond (nee Gammell)

Daughters of James Stewart Gammell
James Stewart Gammell and his wife Anne Bramley had three daughters as follows:

1. Elizabeth Marion Gammell 1871-1959. The second child and eldest daughter was born in the autumn of 1871 in Outwood Yorkshire, where her father was Vicar. She was known throughout her life as 'Elsie' rather than Elizabeth. She married on 29 April 1897 at a large society wedding at St. Palladius Church at Drumtochty, Charles Cheape Mott, son of C.J. Mott of Orwell House, Clifton-on-Dunsmore, Warwickshire. There were no children of this marriage.

Elsie and her husband spent much of their married life at a house named Whitegates, near Ruthin in North Wales, and were immersed in country pursuits. They were particularly interested in horses and riding, but apart from this kept many pets. Elsie was an accomplished pianist, and was steeped in country lore. She befriended many of the local gypsies and interested herself in their customs and welfare. She and her husband jointly wrote and published at least five novels between 1920 and 1930 - 'Clents Way', 'The Sting of the Whip', 'A Man of no Family', 'A Thoroughbred in Training' and 'Betwixt and Between', and in addition to this, Elsie was a fairly regular contributor of articles to The Times Literary Supplement. She obviously had considerable literary talent, as apart from what has been mentioned, she also published a collection of her poetry under the title of 'Dryad's Trove'.

Charles Mott died on 20 November 1930, and Elsie continued to live at Whitegates until she herself died, nearly 20 years later on 20 December 1959.

2. Jessie Bertram Gammell 1872-1874, was born at the end of 1872 at Outwood, and died there almost exactly two years later on 31 December 1874. Her rather unusual Christian names were undoubtedly given her, as her father's sister, whose name was Jessie, and who had married a man whose surname was Bertram, had died in childbirth just a year or two before this Jessie was born.

3. Alice Rosamond Gammell 1875-1962, the youngest child was born like the rest of the
family at Outwood. Throughout her life she was known as 'Toby'. After having spent much
of her youth at Drumtochty, after her father died, she moved with her mother in 1900 to
Nettleham Grange near Lincoln. It was there that she met her future husband Denys Bond,
a school master, and son of John Bond, Archdeacon of Stow, and Precentor of Lincoln
Cathedral. They were married in the Parish Church at Nettleham on 21 December 1908.

3.1 They had one son Geoffrey Bond who was born on 27 May 1912 in Brighton, but he
​spent most of his childhood in Yorkshire.  He married Kathleen Nathan in 1934, but she
and her husband separated after a few years. There were no children of this marriage.  

Having been stationed in Rhodesia during the war, he fell in love with that country and
after the war emigrated, and took up a post in Bulawayo. He was a leading geologist who
won numerous international awards and on his retirement was vice-principal of the
University of Zimbabwe.  On 1 November 1960, he married Marina Levitzky in Bulawayo
and they ​had a son, Ivan and a daughter, Nina. Geoffrey died on 19 June 1983.
An appreciation ​of his life can be found in the downloads section of this website.

'Toby' was a very warm and lively character. Much of her later life was spent in her beloved Yorkshire, where she had been born. She was a well-known breeder of Alsatian dogs, and in the early 1930s was instrumental with another lady, Muriel Crooke, in training the first guide dogs for the blind and starting the now well known charity Guide Dogs for the Blind.

Her husband died on 4 April 1937, and after his death, Toby moved to a cottage in the village of Arncliffe in the Yorkshire Dales. She was devoted to her daughter-in-law Kathleen, who went to live with her at Arncliffe, where they both identified themselves with the life of the village, and lived a happy and frugal life there, until Toby died on 15 August 1962.